Approach

Public service organizations play an enabling, driving, or preventative role in fostering the conditions that mark out progress against tricky public policy challenges, such as securing broad-based prosperity, environmental sustainability, safeguarding public health and safety, and furthering world peace. Because of our experience we appreciate the demands of high level positions in the public sector and the challenges you face in translating knowledge to action.

Our main role is to help leaders of public service organizations shape and energize strategic initiatives. We make concerted efforts to develop and adapt organizational capabilities to suit their foreseen future role in solving public policy problems, we do this by:

  • Helping executives get started with planning strategic initiatives, through applying knowledge-based design approaches to leadership and managemen;
  • Providing key inputs on an ongoing basis as strategic initiatives gather momentum and take hold; and
  • Working directly with our clients in studying what has been experienced, so that research and teaching about public management is rigorous and relevant.

CTSI applies consistent frameworks, interactive methods, lessons from analyzed experience, good judgment, and effective communication skills. We work in confidence with public service organizations and their leaders, seeking to bolster those we support through professional development and by counselling them during strategic initiatives.

The analytics of strategic initiatives.

Click on the images to see them in their full size.

Transitions concept drawn from Michael Watkins, The First 90 Days, Harvard Business School Press, 2003.

Key functions concept drawn from Michael Barzelay and Colin Campbell, Preparing for the Future: Strategic Planning in the U.S. Air Force (Brookings Institution Press, 2003)

As a team, CTSI Fellows understand analytically and know intimately the art of leading strategic initiatives.

A proposed strategic initiative will more likely attract support when fundamental issues are addressed. These are some of the questions that should be asked:

  • What’s the initiative’s purpose, ownership, and distinguishing characteristics?
  • How much novelty is involved in getting it to work?
  • What makes its features (such as scope, participation, and duration) advantageous?
  • What kinds of activities, resources, and structures are required to put this initiative into operation?
  • Why is the timing right, given surrounding agendas and the unrelenting press of routine business?
  • What tests of progress should be administered as the initiative unfolds?
  • What is the exit strategy, if priorities shift or critical success factors fail to materialize?

If you feel that these are some of the questions that CTSI can help you answer then please contact us using the details to the right of this page. We look forward to working with you.